Matteson’s Fridge Raider gets kids coding with Snacker Hacker

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Fridge Raiders teamed up with gaming influencers (who had a combined follower reach of 20 million) to interrupt the space where teens were spending all their time after school while snacking – playing computer games.

Case study summary

• Launched an online challenge to uncover a mysterious hacker
• Posted a video on each of the six influencers’ gaming channels
• 77,000 coding courses completed, the equivalent of 3800 classrooms of kids learning to code.

The challenge

Brand wanted to build brand differentiation amongst teens to choose Fridge Raiders rather than less healthy snacks

The food brand aimed to put their product front of mind for kids, they needed to inhabit the space where teens were spending their time. It aligned with parents they needed to make gaming seem like a valuable activity

The solution

To launch, Matteson’s partnered with 6 of the world’s biggest gaming influencers who showed a mysterious video of the hacker on their channels. These gamers then urged their fans to help unmask the mystery hacker by cracking a series of code cracking challenges.

All activity was kept unbranded for the first week, after which, a series of online adverts and promotional packs containing additional clues and codes revealed that Fridge Raiders was behind the campaign.

As well as providing clues, an ‘Every Pack Wins’ promotion also gave shoppers the chance to win a range of prizes, including PS4s and unique downloads.

Each code breaking challenge hid a secret lesson plan as they learnt how to computer code without even knowing they were doing it. After they completed the game, in addition to unmasking the hacker, they were also awarded a level one in Python programming.

The results

The campaign saw a high level of sustained engagement from kids, with 77,000 courses completed, the equivalent of 3800 classrooms of kids learning to code.

Fridge Raiders recognised the dual activity of snacking and gaming after school. They understood that to put their product front of mind for kids, they needed to inhabit the space where kids are spending their time.

They also realised that gaming is often considered a negative and timewasting activity for parents. The brand cleverly aligned themselves to parents by making the gaming activity an educational one, while in turn, winning over kids by creating a compelling computer game that their parents agreed was a worthwhile activity.

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